Tag Archives: glass art

Chihuly’s Imagination Takes On New Life Forms

There’s a sign in the Franklin Park Conservatory’s show house that reads

“One touch of nature makes the whole world kin” –  Shakespeare

Perhaps the same can be said of a touch of glass art.

As Bruce Harkey, executive director of the Franklin Park Conservatory, said at a recent luncheon hosted by the Columbus Metropolitan Club, there’s something magical and ancient about glass blowing.  Hosted by Ann Fisher of WOSU, Harkey was joined by Columbus Museum of Art executive director, Nannette Maciejunes for a lively conversation on the Chihuly impact on Columbus.

Chihuly’s crew – known as Chihooligans – have been busy this year setting up installations at the CMA, Franklin Park and Hawk Gallery.  Having previously covered the exhibit at the museum in our blog, we thought we’d share our visit to the conservatory.

Chihuly Reimagined blends glass, plant life, color and light in such a way as to render an experience different from the Chihuly exhibit at the CMA.  The greatest example of reimagining the placement of art and nature is seen in the reuse of a massive downed oak tree, which prior to a lightening strike once stood on the northern edge of Franklin Park.

Blue Reeds & Marlins changes by the day and time of day. We happened to experience it on an overcast day.  Sunny days cast deep shadows across the oak’s trunk, while night time adds the element of  lighting by well-known light artist, James Turrell.

“Plants are critical to the experience at the Franklin Park Conservatory,” said Maciejunes during the CMC luncheon. In Macchia Forest, the fluted bowls take on a different feel from those on display in the conservatory’s exhibit room.

The exhibit continues at the conservatory through March 28, 2010.

Live Glass Blowing Demos are held daily in the HotShop from 11-2 on Monday-Friday, from 11-4 on Saturday & Sunday and from 5-8 on Wednesday evenings.

Posted by Pamela J. Willits

Chihuly In Columbus

 © Larry Hamill

© Larry Hamill

The Columbus Museum of Art recently unveiled Chihuly Illuminated – a show of glass, color and light that will remain on display throughout the museum’s renovation.

The exhibit’s centerpiece is Mille Fiori. Italian for “a thousand flowers” this garden of glass spans the length and width of a small pond. Sapphire spirals, orange cattails, an inverted yellow chandelier and yellow platters with scalloped edges resembling giant water lilies reflect off a black acrylic base. The mirror surface adds depth to the piece, giving the illusion that you could step into it and submerge yourself in color.

 © Larry Hamill

© Larry Hamill

In a recent Columbus Dispatch article, Columbus Museum of Art Director Nannette Maciejunes likened the shapes and colors contained in the piece to a baroque symphony.

 © Larry Hamill

© Larry Hamill

The exhibit includes six installations that spans four decades of work and is designed to give the visitor insight into Chihuly’s creative process. Perhaps no piece speaks better to personal influences on his work than the onyx and caramel chandelier. Following his mother’s death in 2006, Chihuly created the Black Chandeliers – the lack of his signature vibrant colors reflecting his period of mourning.

 © Larry Hamill

© Larry Hamill

In stark contrast to this colorless time in Chihuly’s career, is his work with glass and neon. Glass Forest is a melding of hand blown white milk glass and neon light. By dropping molten glass from a ladder, long stems were allowed to form before the glass hit the floor and then solidified.

Glass Forest

© Larry Hamil

The color found in Dark Violet Rain Forest Tumbleweeds, on display in the museum lobby, was created by mixing argon gas with mercury vapor.

Glass Rain Forest  © Larry Hamill

© Larry Hamill

In 1971, Chihuly founded Pilchuck Glass School in Washington. Designed as a studio/apprentice environment, it shifted the focus of glass making from a solitary art form to a collaborative process – a process that would become a necessity for Chihuly, following the loss of his peripheral vision due to an accident.

As he began to create large scale pieces, his art required a team effort. With an emphasis on the effects that gravity and centrifugal forces have on his glass creations, scale has set Chihuly apart from other glass artists.

In keeping with his love of scale, Bowls on Felled Tree is a display of glass vessels on a two ton section of pine tree. The piece pays homage to the geometric patterns and vibrant colors of Native American Indian blankets, as well as to the graceful relaxed forms of woven baskets he has collected over the years. Here, the effects that gravity, weight and time have on objects are exemplified by the drooping edges of his tobacco colored vessels.

Tree

© Larry Hamill

Chihuly Illuminated is part of the Chihuly in Columbus celebration, which includes exhibits at the Franklin Park Conservatory and Hawk Gallery.

Special thanks to Nancy Colvin of the Columbus Museum of Art for the guided tour.

Posted by Pamela J. Willits

BIGG Glass Art Breaks New Ground

Photo © Larry Hamill

Photo © Larry Hamill

BIGGBreakthrough Ideas in Global Glass – is currently on display at the OSU Urban Arts Space and Hawk Galleries. A collaboration between The Ohio State University’s Dept. of Art Glass Program, OSU Urban Arts Space and Hawk Galleries, the exhibit showcases 43 international artists.

A total of 97 pieces of glass artwork were selected following a juried review of over 650 artists’ submits. The international jury panel included Italian
glass artisan, Lino Tagliapietra; the Corning Museum’s Curator of Modern Glass, Tina Oldknow and Director of Hawk Galleries, Tom Hawk.

Over the years, William Morris, Dale Chihuly, Christopher Ries and Lino Tagliapietra, among others, have led the glass art movement. Sponsored by Steuben Glass, this exhibition was designed to advance new and innovative glass art worldwide. “We were looking for the next talent in glass art,” said Kelly Kaser, Deputy Director of the OSU Urban Arts Space.

Photo © Larry Hamill

Photo © Larry Hamill

Hiromi Takizawa’s piece entitled, Crossing the Pacific Ocean, combines a neon airplane suspended above an arrangement of glass bowls, creating a reflection in bubbles that seem to float across the ocean’s surface.

Photo © Larry Hamill

Photo © Larry Hamill

Pallbearers, by Mielle Riggie, personifies man’s circle of life. A fragile leaf with serrated edges gently rests on inverted tree branches, as if being carried away to its final resting place. The frosted white glass mimics an ice formation, serving as a reminder of winter and the final season of life.

Photo © Larry Hamill

Photo © Larry Hamill

Equally remarkable is Karen Reid’s floor installation entitled, Creek. Cast of optic crystal, the nine linear interlocking pieces resemble a once flowing creek now frozen over. While appearing inert, the piece also seems to undulate – an effect caused by the glass radiating light at different angles.

Photo © Larry Hamill

Photo © Larry Hamill

Quincy Neri incorporates enamels with blown glass to create rich red and deep purple sculptures. According to her artist statement, her work contains the “underlying themes of violence and danger that underpin American society…asking the viewer to rethink their understanding of political reality”. However, this viewer sees her work differently, reinforcing the notion that everyone views art from a unique and personal vantage point.

Artist’s bios can be seen on the Hawk Galleries BIGG web page.

BIGG will be on display at both Columbus downtown locations through October 10, 2009.

Special thanks to Kelly Kaser and the staff at the OSU Urban Arts Space and Susan Janowicz at Hawk Galleries for their time and insight.

Written by Pamela J. Willits